Monthly Archives: February 2018

Adidas Womens Frank Vatrano Jersey Bruins Sale 60% Off

Austin Czarnik is used to top-line duties. The 25-year-old leads Providence with 42 points in 38 games this season and anchors the P-Bruins’ lead trio.

But when Czarnik was recalled to Boston for Saturday night’s showdown with the Toronto Maple Leafs, he knew he would have to make an impact in a different way. Playing instead in a fourth-line role, Czarnik was tasked with creating energy and momentum each time he hit the ice.

The Detroit native delivered, forming a solid unit with Frank Vatrano and Sean Kuraly. Czarnik did not land a shot on goal in just over nine minutes of ice time, but did pick up an assist on Torey Krug’s power-play tally.

“I think he was good. Lots of energy, on the puck, made a play on the power play, which we’re used to seeing him make. So, I thought that whole line did their job pretty well,” said Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy. “No complaints…and that’s what we need.”

While playing in a slightly different role, Czarnik felt comfortable alongside Kuraly, his former teammate at Miami (Ohio), and Vatrano, his former linemate in Providence. While with the P-Bruins, Czarnik and Vatrano were a lethal combination that combined for 56 goals during the 2015-16 campaign.

“I played with Sean in college for three years and Frank in Providence and a little bit here so I know what type of players they are and what they like to do,” said Czarnik, who will be back in the lineup on Tuesday night in his hometown against the Red Wings. “I think we are just one step off from getting a lot of chances, but it was a good game for us…it was exciting, just create energy out there was my goal and our line did a good job of forcing a lot of turnovers.”

Czarnik was placed on Boston’s second power-play unit against the Maple Leafs, which proved to be a sound decision when he delivered a feed to Krug, who ripped home a one-timer to give the Bruins a 3-1 lead in the second period.

“I didn’t know what to expect coming into [Saturday night], so it was nice to get that [opportunity] – and we scored on one of them, so it was perfect,” said Czarnik, who has two assists in seven games with Boston this season.

The 5-foot-9, 160-pound forward’s previous two stints with the big club this season came prior to the team’s 25-4-4 run. This time around, he said, there is a noticeably different feel within the group.

“We were struggling there a bit more then,” said Czarnik. “But now the team is playing together and they are doing everything they need to do every night. So, it’s a fun time to be a part of it.”

Opposing View

The Bruins will be making their second visit to Detroit on Tuesday night. Boston’s first trip to Little Caesars Arena resulted in a thrilling 3-2 overtime victory, during which Brad Marchand notched the winner in the extra session.

Detroit has posted a 4-5-1 record over its last 10 games and is currently 7 points out of the East’s second wild-card spot. The Rangers, who the Bruins will visit on Wednesday, have dropped two straight and have just three wins in their last 10.

As a result, Boston is expecting two teams with an added level of urgency.

“I think we’ve tried to always worry about ourselves first. I think we understand that the majority of the teams that we’re gonna be playing are in a little bit more of a fight than we are,” said Cassidy. “We all want our points…they are a little more desperate than we are – we have to be cognizant of that, but at the same time play our game.

“There’s too many games to get caught up every night in what the other team is doing. We always address what they do well, where we can attack them and go from there and try not to worry about the standings too much, to be perfectly honest. There’s no easy games in this league.”

Marchand’s Return Near

Brad Marchand will be back in the lineup on this trip, with the winger serving the final game of his five-game suspension for elbowing on Tuesday in Detroit. Boston’s leading scorer will be eligible to return on Wednesday against the Rangers.

“Time goes by slow when you’re out, but it’s been a lot of fun to watch the guys play the way they have,” said Marchand, whose teammates have posted a 3-1-0 record in his absence. “They’re playing very well. Looking forward to getting back. It’s fun to watch, but it’s not fun to be out. It just shows how good of a team we have. But you hate to miss time and be out. It will be great to be back be in the room.”

Noel Acciari (lower-body), Anders Bjork (upper-body), and Kevan Miller (upper-body) all missed practice. Bjork will not travel with the team on the road trip, while Miller and Acciari “are unlikely to travel [with the team] but could join us,” according to Cassidy.

Acciari, who has missed the last four games, has been skating on his own. Miller and Bjork have not yet resumed any on-ice activities.

Split Duties

Cassidy said that Tuukka Rask would be in net on Tuesday night in Detroit, while Anton Khudobin is expected to get the call on Wednesday in New York.

Adidas Bruins Charlie McAvoy Youth Jersey Sale Discount

Charlie McAvoy remembers the fear.

The Boston Bruins rookie was playing against the Edmonton Oilers on Nov. 26 at TD Garden when his heart started beating irregularly and fast.

McAvoy also remembers the good news.

“I think it was relief first off to find out it was not life-threatening and not dangerous to my overall health,” the 20-year-old defenseman said during a news conference at Warrior Ice Arena on Monday, his first comments since undergoing a procedure Jan. 22 to correct his condition.

“To realize that obviously I’m in there, kind of nervous, was this going to be something that’s really bad, will I be able to play again or anything like that? So to find out that it was something that was not dangerous … something I could still continue to play with, that was a good takeaway from the overall situation.”

McAvoy said he’d had similar episodes in the past but the one against the Oilers was the longest. He alerted team internist Dr. David Finn and trainer Don Del Negro. Tests confirmed Finn’s diagnosis of a supraventricular tachycardia, a condition not considered dangerous.

An ablation, the removal of tissue, was done through a small catheter that entered through the lower abdomen and up into the heart.

Doctors assured McAvoy he could keep playing with little risk of anything worse than another episode. He continued to play and didn’t miss a game until the day after the procedure.

“Charlie talked about the time frame about when the decision was made, it was about the best medical decision for Charlie regardless of what games he was going to miss,” Bruins general manager Don Sweeney said. “That’s probably been one of the most amazing things, is how well he’s handled knowing that this was on deck and going out there and playing at the level he was. It says a lot about him.”

McAvoy leads NHL rookies in ice time per game (22 minutes, 49 seconds) and has five goals and 20 assists in 45 games. He hadn’t missed a game until Jan. 23 and gave no indication of what he was going through.

He put aside the prospect of another episode but was buoyed by knowing there was a plan should he have a reoccurrence.

“Were it to come back, I knew I would be fine,” McAvoy said. “We kind of talked about a little strategy if it did come back, kind of remove myself from the game and allow myself time to get my heart back [to normal] and feel good. Luckily we didn’t get to that point.”

McAvoy is to have a follow-up appointment with his doctor this week when his path to returning to the lineup will be determined. The Bruins initially predicted he would miss two weeks.

Under doctor’s orders he did no physical activity in the week after his procedure. But Monday he briefly skated on his own before the Bruins held their first on-ice practice since the All-Star break.

McAvoy doesn’t expect his play to be much different when he returns. Maybe he’ll need a little extra time to get in full shape, but that’s it.

“I’m still the same person,” he said. “I’m one week removed and I feel good. So we’ll get back out there and we’ll get on the ice and see how things are going. And when the time is right I’ll get back out there.”